I happened to come across a series of poetry written by a 15-year-old girl who was the daughter of a narcissistic mother. While they may seem amateur and angsty, the experiences and the emotions of this kid as she navigated the waters of having a toxic parent are pretty clear.

I want to share them with you today in an effort to show you, without question, exactly what goes on inside the head of a daughter of a narcissistic mother. And I want to be able to finally give this girl a voice – one she should’ve always had, but one that was denied her for so many years.

Maybe you’ll relate to this because your own mother is a narcissist. Maybe you want to read them because your wife is a narcissist and you want to understand how your kids feel better, or how to protect them from her manipulation and psychological warfare.

Let’s take a look at the poems.

Family

Family

Tears fall from my eyes
I care not to claim my family ties.
They hold me down, they let me out a bit –
But then pull me back again,
only to find things worse.
The others –
they’ve got it so good.
But they don’t know it.
They don’t live with me.
I wonder why they try to make it seem so bad?
Why do they try?

This poem seems to point to the obvious toxic family dynamic, in which the author feels oppressed and invisible in her own family and jealous of her friends who have parents who actually seem to care about them in a way her own do not. 

Enemy

Enemy

The world is your enemy, my child.
Believe not what they tell you.
When they tell you that they love you, they lie.
The world is your enemy, my child.
They care not about you.
They only want what you have to give.
The world, my child, is your enemy.

This poem points to the perspective of the world the author has developed up to this point. She doesn’t trust her primary caregiver, and this leads her to doubt the entire world. 

Up to this point, everyone has left her feeling abandoned, lost, alone and not good enough. She feels like she needs to be completely self-reliant. (Future glimpse: Ironically, less than 10 years later, she would find herself married to yet another narcissist.)

Untitled (Trust No One)

Trust no one.
You have no one to trust.
The world is a liar – it won’t stay faithful.
Lies only hurt more than truth.
Actions speak.
Where to turn?
I am lost.
I have no one to confide in.
I shall soon be a flat little pile of emotion,
with no purpose to life,
except to be sick
and in pain.
I am dying.
I am going now
to speed up the process.

The dark sentiments continue in this poem, which the author left untitled, written immediately after a betrayal by her toxic mother. She feels alone and seems to be in gut-wrenching emotional pain. 

As you can see, the author feels completely destroyed and like she is living in absolute hell at the hands of a completely unempathetic mother that she can not escape.

Love?

Love?

Confidence slain
By harsh words,
I cry.
I know not what to do.
She hurts me,
but then
expects love
and respect.
She only receives
deep resent
and hatred,
and death wishes.
Death should be granted to the lonely,
the miserable,
and the mothers.
Hell is for me.

This poem digs into the toxic parenting a bit, discussing how she has been humiliated and emotionally devastated by the toxic mother’s behavior. She feels oppressed and silenced as she relives the trauma of having been called out in a public way. She painfully remembers the faces and the way they looked at her in the moment and begs for peace as she recognizes that the kind of “love” her mother gives her isn’t real – that it’s toxic. And she’s feeling like she can’t get out of this unless she ends her own life.

Alone

Alone

Leave.
I beg you silently,
Leave me alone.
I do not want your
“love” or “affection.”
I want you to
leave me alone.
Your kind of love
is not the kind of love I need.
Humiliation
is not a good teacher.
The names…
The faces…
The feelings…
Garbled up with you
to me, spell SUICIDE.
Please,
I beg of you,
Leave me alone.

In this poem, the author makes it clear that she has been emotionally abused by her narcissistic mother and has described in no uncertain terms exactly how that feels to her.

It Is Depression

It is Depression

It is depression when it hurts to smile.
She makes me cry with just a look. She hates me.
Why does she keep me around
if she hates me?
It is depression when you know
that your own mother hates you.
I carry this weight
that I do not need.
It is depression when you
have no will power.
It is depression when you
are me.
I am depression.

In this poem, the author expresses how it feels to be in a deep, situational depression where she isn’t functioning on a healthy level as a direct result of the abuse she’s experiencing at the hands of her narcissistic mother

She describes how her mother can just look at her and bring her to tears, and makes it clear that she feels like her mother hates her. She feels the psychological weight of oppression and is angry at herself for not being able to stand up for herself.

Who was this mysterious poet?

If you’ve stuck with me this long, you might have already figured out that this teenager was me. (You can read my whole story here.)

I found these poems while digging through boxes of my old writing a few months ago and I saved them to share with you for a couple of reasons.

First, reading them back made me recall how it felt to be raised by such a person. And in a way, they sort of validated me. It’s easy to develop abuse amnesia, even when you do what I do for a living. It’s easy to forget how difficult it was to go through the pain we did. And it’s easy to wonder if it really was that bad.

The silver lining in all of this is that my son is currently 15, and finding these poems gave me some insight for which I am grateful: I have given my kids something that I always intended to give them – the support and encouragement they need to see themselves as “real people,” who are whole, legitimate and deserving of being heard. The knowledge that their thoughts, feelings, beliefs and ideas are valid and worth discussing. The understanding that they are unconditionally loved and that they deserve to be happy and healthy and safe in their lives. The power of their own voices.

So, if you are here because you want to know what to do to prevent your own kids from experiencing this pain, or because you need to find a way to reparent your own inner child, then this is the bottom line on what you need to express and what you need them to know about themselves.

1. You are a real person who is whole, legitimate and worth being heard.
2. Your thoughts, feelings, beliefs, and ideas are valid and worth discussing.
3. You are loved unconditionally and you deserve to be happy, healthy and safe in your life.
4. Your own voice has power and should be used to express yourself with love.

Take the Toxic Mother Quiz

Does this stuff feel familiar to you? Are you wondering if you’re the daughter (or son) of a narcissistic mother? If so, you might want to take this quiz. Your results will direct you to some additional helpful information about being the child of a narcissistic parent and how to heal. 

Is your mother toxic?

Could your mother be toxic? Is it possible she’s a narcissist? Take this quick assessment and find out today.

Does your mother ever make you feel like you’re just not good enough?

Yes, at least some of the time.

No, never.

I’m not sure.

Does your mother tell you that she knows you better than you know yourself, or act like she knows what you’re thinking even when she is wrong?

Yes, at least some of the time.

No, never.

It’s hard to say.

Do you or did you ever just know that your relationship with your mom wasn’t healthy, even when she told you it was?

Yes, at least some of the time.

No, never.

I’m not really sure.

Does or did your mom ever tell you or others that you needed mental help, medication, counseling or other kinds of intervention, even when you felt that you did not?

Yes, at least some of the time.

No, never.

I’m not sure.

Does or did your mother ever try to choose your friends or partners, whether directly or through manipulation?

Yes, at least some of the time.

No, never.

I’m not sure.

Does your mother only seem to remember something if it’s convenient for her?

Yes, at least some of the time.

No, never.

It’s hard to say.

Have you ever lied to your mother to prevent some kind of negative reaction, such as physical or emotional punishment or even just a guilt trip or silent treatment?

Yes, at least some of the time.

No, never

I don’t know.

Does your mother seem to wish you were someone else?

True. At least some of the time.

False. This isn’t an issue for me.

Unsure. This is a little confusing for me.

When you interact with your mom, do you walk away feeling amazing, or do you feel terrible? Or something in between?

I usually feel bad about myself or my life after talking to my mom.

I always feel great after talking to my mom!

I feel confused or otherwise ambivalent after talking to my mom.

Does your mom judge and criticize your choices on a regular basis?

Yes, at least some of the time.

No, never, or hardly ever.

I’m not sure.

Has your mom given you long silent treatments?

Yes, at least a few times.

No, never.

I’m not sure.

Does your mom use guilt trips, cry and/or tug at your heart strings to get you to do what she wants?

Yes, at least some of the time.

No, never.

I’m not sure.

Is your mom very overbearing and controlling?

Absolutely yes, at least some of the time.

No, never.

I’m not sure.

Does your mom show real concern for how you feel and act accordingly?

Yes, she has total empathy and respect for me.

No, she clearly does not care how I feel and does not respect me at all.

I’m not sure.

https://queenbeeing.com/raised-by-a-narcissistic-mother-shocking-insight-into-long-term-effects-you-need-to-understand/ By Angela Atkinson